Initially, it doesn’t seem like hearing loss would have any impact on someone’s physical fitness, but I’m curious to know if others find that they’re less inclined to exercise because of deafness or wearing a hearing aid.

For me, as you know from my strangely specific quest of finding a waterproof hearing aid, I’d love to be able to swim and hear, especially for safety purposes like lifeguard announcements, but also just to be more comfortable in a group setting at the pool, or swimming lanes for exercise. I feel pretty discouraged by swimming as exercise.

In 2015, I decided to do the Couch to 5K program, and signed up for a Halloween 5K as my goal. (And may I just brag, I won the bronze in my age group, but I should probably tell you there were only 5 women in the 20-29 bracket…)

But, I did have to do several things differently to train for this 5K, and if I hadn’t been as determined as I was, I can see how I would have felt discouraged by the limitations of my hearing aid.

Firstly, I wanted to listen to my 5K app prompts for walking/running and to hear my mile splits. And listen to music too! But I can’t wear in-ear buds and over the ear headphones are way too cumbersome to run in. What I did was I used a T-coil hook, which worked well, but I still wasn’t ever totally comfortable cutting out all surrounding noise like cars or other people, so I’d switch off telecoil whenever I was crossing a road or anything. Furthermore, it didn’t always stay put in the best spot behind my ear, which sometimes led to a rapid bobbing of audio coming in and out as I ran… not ideal, but it worked.

The next issue was sweat, especially since I had started my training in the summer. My new aid seems to be pretty moisture-resistant, but I had to be a lot more careful with my previous one. I found that wearing the T-coil hook kept the aid off my head enough, and since it was only a 5K, I wasn’t sweating for too long before I could remove it and wipe it down.

Now that I’m 6 months postpartum, I’m thinking about these things again and might revisit what accessories I use.

Do you feel like there’s anything that keeps you from your fitness goals?

So on Twitter, I try every month to participate in #HearingLossHour. Like it implies, it’s an hour-long Twitter chat with some question prompts—mostly based in the UK but I’m up early with the baby anyways so I like to think I provide the American perspective.

Anyways, September’s topic was about single-sided hearing loss, and that was a broad term, to encompass the fact that some people only have one “good ear.” For me, I can’t hear anything in my right (well, maybe I once faintly heard a fighter jet flying over) and wear a BTE aid in my “good ear.”

Amazingly, during the course of the chat, I learned something new that a LOT of other people know about, which goes to show that even though I do my best to stay on top of technology, there’s usually gaps in your niche knowledge, which is why things like Twitter conversations are so great. I learned that CROS (which stands for Contralateral Routing Of Signals) is like a hearing aid supplement for your “bad side,” carrying the audio picked up in a BTE receiver and throwing it into your main workhorse aid that you wear. Here’s the image from Phonak’s brochure to show what I mean:


What does that mean for me? It means I could wear it and have a MUCH easier time when I’m the driver in a car, because the passenger is on my bad ear. It’s hard to glance over to try and hear/lipread for a second, and maintain safe focus on the road, especially on the Beltway in DC… It means I wouldn’t have to try and arrange myself so specifically at every table in a group setting.

Phonak (who sponsors the monthly chat) has a CROS aid option that you can look into here. Starkey also has the Muse CROS, which you can look into here.

So I JUST got a new hearing aid fully covered by insurance in February, so it’ll be a few years before I can take advantage again and try to get a CROS system, because it seems like Oticon doesn’t manufacture CROS aids. Why did my audiologist not suggest it? I have no idea and fully intend to ask next time I go in. I do think it’d be weird to wear an aid of sorts on my right side again, as I haven’t done that since early childhood.

Do you use a CROS and love it?

With the rise of smart home technology, it naturally follows that there are a few of us out there wondering what it can do for those with hearing loss. It’s such a new arena though, that there’s a long way to go before the deaf and HoH community isn’t an afterthought in the process.

That said, a lot of the possibilities with these smart products do work nicely for the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. So, I’ve decided to start a little series featuring one or two of these products at a time. I’ll also build a list into my equipment pages as I go. I’d love to hear if you use any of these or other products in your life!

Canary

This month, I’m featuring the Canary security camera, which is a motion-activated security camera that sends push notifications of movement or abnormal environmental factors such as temperature and air quality. I actually have their main all-in-one model, and while I mostly get alerts when my dog barks at the mailman, it does give me peace of mind when I’m away from the home (and checking in on my dog, as you can see from the photo below).

Screenshot of Canary security footage

Integration with a smartphone is the main benefit to those D/deaf and hard of hearing users. If you’re like me and sleep with your phone under the pillow on vibrate, you can get an instant notification of motion detected if you want; this one in particular is a relief to me when my (hearing) husband is out of town and my brain goes crazy with burglar scenarios while lying in bed at night. I usually turn on the “do not disturb” feature on my iPhone at night which mutes Canary alerts, but I leave it off when I’m home alone overnight.

For deaf users that may live in an area where they’re worried about outside activity, you can also purchase the Canary Flex, which is a weatherproof outdoor security camera. This all integrates together in the app, which is easy to use.

I have to say, my series on smart home tech for the deaf and hard of hearing might be shorter than I thought, because there’s not a lot out there. That said, I do appreciate that Canary addresses this specific user group in an FAQ on their website:

Are options available for customers who are deaf or hard of hearing?

This is something we are considering and hope to address more fully in the future. As the system is designed now, alerts are sent directly to your smartphone via push notification and do not rely on sound. The device itself has a subtle LED light that indicates if its recording. The siren, which can be triggered remotely from the app, serves as an intruder deterrent if you choose to use it. We welcome feedback, feature requests, and insights that might help us make Canary more universally accessible and usable for those with hearing difficulties. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch. (source)

When there IS activity, you can choose to sound a loud siren on the Canary device, and/or call emergency services from within the app. I’m assuming that button simply dials 911. I speak, so this wouldn’t be an issue for me, but it would slow down an emergency response for a deaf user. Where I live in Fairfax County, texting 911 is a pretty new cutting-edge feature, and I hope in the future, apps like this will be able to take a deaf user into consideration in preferences and initiate texting or a TTY/relay service immediately for quicker response.

What do you think might be a good feature? Would it be good if there was a subtle light that indicated there had been activity, prompting you to review the log on your phone? Is this something you have and feel it benefits you?

With the rise of smart home technology, it naturally follows that there are a few of us out there wondering what it can do for those with hearing loss. It’s such a new arena though, that there’s a long way to go before the deaf and HoH community isn’t an afterthought in the process.

That said, a lot of the possibilities with these smart products do work nicely for the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. So, I’ve decided to start a little series featuring one or two of these products at a time. I’ll also build a list into my equipment pages as I go. I’d love to hear if you use any of these or other products in your life!

Philips Hue lightbulbs

My first featured product is the Philips Hue, a wireless LED bulb. These are popular for their integration with smartphones and devices like the Amazon Echo, most notably for the ability to set the lighting color and dimness just from your device. For those with hearing loss, the Hue bulbs can be linked into conditional situations—for example, if the doorbell rings, the lights can flash to alert someone. There are products for the deaf that already do this, but don’t have the smart wireless integration that can be customized pretty finely.

Specifically, let’s say you have the Ring smart doorbell, and Philips Hue lights. Using an IFTTT (if this then that) simple chain, you can have your home lights flash purple when someone’s at the door. This is definitely something I could take advantage of! The Hue bulbs are still pretty pricey, so this is certainly an investment but a fantastic one.

Furthermore, Philips allowed their Hue bulbs to be part of an open-source platform, and because of this, makers of products and software for the deaf are able to integrate with Hue bulbs. Convo, a business that provides video calling and translation services for the deaf, was able to create a Hue lights feature in their Convo Relay app, which allows for the Hue bulbs to flash when there is an incoming call. Not only that, but it can be customized for specific callers with “light ringtones.” Lights can also notify of missed calls.

Side note: when it comes to safety, definitely rely on the non-smart things. You don’t want to be depending on your Hue bulbs flashing if your smoke alarm is going off, for example. Stick with the specialty strobe products for that one.

Do any of you use the Hue features? I’d love to try this someday. And if you have another smart home product you’d like me to discuss in the future, let me know!